Spilling the Beans

Spilling the Beans As a child Clarissa Dickson Wright was surrounded by wealth and privilege Her mother was an Australian heiress her father a brilliant surgeon to the Royal family But he was also a tyrannical and vio

  • Title: Spilling the Beans
  • Author: Clarissa Dickson Wright
  • ISBN: 9780340933886
  • Page: 232
  • Format: Hardcover
  • As a child, Clarissa Dickson Wright was surrounded by wealth and privilege Her mother was an Australian heiress, her father a brilliant surgeon to the Royal family But he was also a tyrannical and violent drunk who used to beat her and force her to eat rotten food When her adored mother died suddenly, Clarissa fell into a mind numbing decade of wild overindulgence thatAs a child, Clarissa Dickson Wright was surrounded by wealth and privilege Her mother was an Australian heiress, her father a brilliant surgeon to the Royal family But he was also a tyrannical and violent drunk who used to beat her and force her to eat rotten food When her adored mother died suddenly, Clarissa fell into a mind numbing decade of wild overindulgence that eventually cost her entire fortune After a long, hard road to recovery, Clarissa finally faced her demons and turned to the one thing that had always brought her joy cooking Now at last she has found sobriety and peace, and her TV parternship with the beloved late Jennifer Paterson as the Two Fat Ladies brought her fame and success With stark honesty and brilliant wit, this is Clarissa s own story of a life lived to extremes.

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      Posted by:Clarissa Dickson Wright
      Published :2019-04-21T08:55:35+00:00

    About “Clarissa Dickson Wright

    • Clarissa Dickson Wright

      Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda Dickson Wright is an English celebrity chef and food historian who is best known as one half, along with Jennifer Paterson, of the Two Fat Ladies Having trained as a lawyer, at the age of 21, Dickson Wright passed her exams and became the country s youngest barrister She is also one of only two women in England to become a guild butcher.

    886 thoughts on “Spilling the Beans

    • "All of us have something we can do, some more than others, but everyone has a natural gift; it is just a question of discovering it.”I remember watching my first episode of Two Fat Ladies back in 2009. Netflix kept recommending it based on my interests, and back in the day when people had discs mailed, I took a big gamble by using all three of my movie slots for the show, on a weekend no less. I was bowled over by the unique concept of the show! What didn’t these women do?! They cooked, bak [...]


    • I am not a keen cook, so was only vaguely aware of the highly successful television cooking duo, "Two Fat Ladies", who thundered around Britain on a motorbike creating meals in various unusual venues.This is the story of one of that duo - Clarissa Dickson Wright.She was born into a highly successful family, with perhaps with more than its far share of eccentrics. Her father was one of these. He was a lauded London surgeon, and also a violent alcoholic, and he was violent towards Clarissa, as wel [...]


    • I was familiar with the author from the Two Fat Ladies cooking program, so recently listened to her narrate Clarissa's England, which was terrific. After that, I was truly intrigued by her life story, but the audio version comes highly abridged, so I read a print copy instead -- what a ride! Clarissa squanders early advantages many couldn't begin to imagine for the life of such a dedicated alcoholic it's amazing she made it through; at one point she's diagnosed with quinine poisoning from all th [...]


    • Wright was one half of the TV cooks "Two Fat Ladies". This is her autobiography and it's fascinating to see how much of her early life paralleled mine: a family connection to Singapore, an abusive home life, a best friend in boarding school called Caroline :-). Clarissa is unflinchingly honest about her life, growing up in a highly dysfunctional family, becoming a lawyer just to spite her father, her 6-year long descent into alcoholism after losing her mother and the love of her life and how she [...]


    • From a privileged beginning, the author suffered huge family problems in her formative years. Having 'gone off the rails' early in a promising career at the bar, she preferred to spend time in the bar. This book outlines her fight back to normality, her unplanned friendship with the other 'fat lady' Jennifer Paterson, and her passion for the countryside.


    • "All of us are an accumulation of the traits, genetic tendencies, geographicals and peculiarities of our forebears. These are the ingredients that we and the adventures and misfortunes of our lives process into the finished dish that becomes ourselves."Not the greatest writing style, but definitely a very gripping read.


    • What an extraordinary life! An incredible, frank and honest account of her life with its extremes of highs and lows, you couldn't make it up!


    • What a colourful life. She certainly didn't wait for the storm to pass to dance in the rain. What strength it must have taken to get over her addiction and lead a happy life eventually.


    • Despite her difficult childhood and alcoholism this is an upbeat autobiography, ending on a positive note: "Believe me on one thing: I have a splendidly enjoyable life"


    • Clarissa of "Two Fat Ladies" fame has written a very good and entertaining autobiography. This is an insightful look into the devastating effects of alcoholism through many generations of her family and her own downward spiral into this disease as well as the climb out of it to recovery.She grew up in a privileged English family but in perpetual fear of her father and his physical abuse of her and her mother. The youngest of the children, she has a lot to bear and feels very responsible for supp [...]


    • This really is a fascinating and uncompromising autobiography. Clarissa is very honest about her difficult and often violent family life growing up, and later her own alcoholism. Her life during the 1970's and 80's seemed a constant round of parties, pubs and drinking buddies and at one point Clarissa admits that the Falklands war had passed her by - she'd had no idea it had happened. Although this does make for difficult reading on one level - it was strangely fascinating on another and it is p [...]


    • Whether your interests are the history of farmers' markets and English cooking, the arguments for hunting in Britain, religious faith, the existence of ghosts, the demon drink and AA's 12 Steps program, recovering from child abuse, or simply insider knowledge about various politicians and the royal family, this book has it all. The author shows herself to be someone of considerable intelligence, sense of humour and pluck and this book should be read for more reasons than just that she is well kn [...]


    • An unflinchingly honest account of her life from Clarissa Dickson Wright, one half of The Two Fat Ladies. Her childhood was, quite frankly, awful but she never uses it as an excuse for the many things that went wrong in her life. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, her character and determination shine through and I feel full of admiration for the way she has picked herself up and started again on numerous occasions. Well worth reading if you like a well written, good autobiography.


    • A frank autobiography by the surviving "Fat Lady". She pulls few punches as she writes about her abusive childhood, her debauched twenties and thirties, her recovery from alcoholism and her eventual television fame. CD-W writes just as she speaks - you can almost hear her voice as you read. Unfortunately, the book suffers from poor or nonexistent copy-editing. There are errors throughout - not what I would have expected from Hodder & Stoughton.


    • A very frank autobiography by the surviving Fat Lady chronicling her passage from disfunctional childhood to early legal success followed by her sinking into total alcoholic dissipation when she blew her 2.8 million pound inheritance and descended to the depths followed by her drying-out and rehabilitation leading to TV fame. She is a remarkable woman with a deep love of the countryside and tells a good story.


    • This is a very entertaining auto biographyI was always fascinated but the PBS Show Two Fat Ladies and now the story of Clarissa e was a wounded child and smart ry smartowing up privileged in England is a different type of life x hunts,boarding school and all that.She was a crazy alcoholic but by 40 became sober and really recovered e end of book bogs down on Brotains stoppage of fox huntswhich she was pro onOverall a light summer read.


    • Well written, frank, amusing, shocking, gossipy. I did briefly mourn over her lost 2,8 million pounds and career in law (she did have talent!) but heck why - Clarissa didn't seem to cry over spilled beans. A lesson we should all learn.The campaigning for fox hunting went on a bit, but otherwise no objections.


    • Very frank autobiography. Often quite painful to read. There's much about her lifestyle now that I disagree with, e.g support of blood sports, but I can't help but have enormous respect for what she has overcome personally to reach this stage in her life.


    • Clarissa certainly had a colorful and sometimes tragic life. She triumphed over adversity and always kept her sense of humor. This memoir made for very interesting reading.


    • Fascinating memoir but terrible editing. I felt I should have had a red pen with me but this Fat Lady does tell her story very well otherwise.


    • As much as I adore the Two Fat Ladies, the program and the wonderful Clarissa and Jennifer, I have to say this memoir is not entirely satisfying. The best part is in the first half detailing Clarissa's upbringing amongst privilege and abuse and her descent into alcoholism. She clearly lived an amazing life, however, the book is written in such a way as to make it all sound rather boring. Many people in he life are mentioned but they are all just listed and given a brief description so the reader [...]


    • A wonderful book from one of the Two Fat Ladies, Clarissa Dickson Wright. Having lived an extraordinary life, Clarissa exorcises her demons, provides the background to an amazing life and tells with affection of the days of Two Fat Ladies, arguably her most recognised work. If you like this, download the podcast of her Desert Island Discs.


    • An interesting autobiography. It took me a while to get used to Wright's rambling writing style and there were lots of words/concepts I wasn't familiar with, but nevertheless I enjoyed reading it. I do remember the TV show Two Fat Ladies.


    • A fascinating tale - but far too rambling for me - and so many names, I couldn't every quite get my head around who was who and where they fitted in. I feel terrible giving it just two stars, as such a colourful life really should deserve more.



    • Loved this book. I didn't realize the countryside was still dealing with the issues that Clarissa discusses. I admit I had to look up a few of her terms because they are foreign to American eyes.




    • I am happy I finished reading Clarissa Dickson Wright's (more presicely Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda Dickson Wright's) book titled Spilling The Beans. The book is the autobiography of a lady with a very unusual path of life. She was born in the middle of the nineties into a noble British family just to sink to the deepest depths later on. From there she could emerge again as one of the most famous chefs in the UK - actually that is how I to [...]


    • I've loved the BBC show Two Fat Ladies for years, and have managed to turn a few of my friends on to them as well. Most of the food these rotund ladies cook looks fabulous, if artery-hardening, with loads of butter and fat. Their banter is the big reason to watch, as they sing songs, cook boar stew and walnut cakes, and offer up bits of homily, such as: "A woman, a dog and a chestnut tree -- the more you beat them the better they'll be," etc. My personal favorite is when Clarissa reminisced abou [...]


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