Dreams of Speaking

Dreams of Speaking We must talk Alice Black about this world of modern things This buzzing world Alice is entranced by the aesthetics of technology and in every aeroplane flight every Xerox machine every neon sign

  • Title: Dreams of Speaking
  • Author: Gail Jones
  • ISBN: 9781843431978
  • Page: 321
  • Format: Hardcover
  • We must talk, Alice Black, about this world of modern things.This buzzing world Alice is entranced by the aesthetics of technology and, in every aeroplane flight, every Xerox machine, every neon sign, sees the poetry of modernity Mr Sakamoto, a survivor of the atomic bomb, is an expert on Alexander Graham Bell The pair forge an unlikely friendship as Mr Sakamoto regale We must talk, Alice Black, about this world of modern things.This buzzing world Alice is entranced by the aesthetics of technology and, in every aeroplane flight, every Xerox machine, every neon sign, sees the poetry of modernity Mr Sakamoto, a survivor of the atomic bomb, is an expert on Alexander Graham Bell The pair forge an unlikely friendship as Mr Sakamoto regales Alice with stories of twentieth century invention His own knowledge begins to inform her writing, and these two solitary beings become a mutual support for each other a long way from home.This novel from Man Booker longlisted author Gail Jones is distinguished by its honesty and intelligence From the boundlessness of space walking to the frustrating constrictions of one person s daily existence, Dreams of Speaking paints with grace and skill the experience of needing to belong despite wanting to be alone.

    • ✓ Dreams of Speaking || ✓ PDF Download by ✓ Gail Jones
      321 Gail Jones
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Dreams of Speaking || ✓ PDF Download by ✓ Gail Jones
      Posted by:Gail Jones
      Published :2019-06-03T05:17:32+00:00

    About “Gail Jones

    • Gail Jones

      Gail Jones is the author of two short story collections, a critical monograph, and the novels BLACK MIRROR, SIXTY LIGHTS, DREAMS OF SPEAKING, SORRY and FIVE BELLS Three times shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award, her prizes include the WA Premier s Award for Fiction, the Nita B Kibble Award, the Steele Rudd Award, the Age Book of the Year Award, the Adelaide Festival Award for Fiction and the ASAL Gold Medal She has also been shortlisted for international awards, including the IMPAC and the Prix Femina Her fiction has been translated into nine languages Gail has recently taken up a Professorship at UWS.

    269 thoughts on “Dreams of Speaking

    • I read her book Sorry years ago and it was an odd experience where I didn't love the book, but was really struck by the writing. I waited years to read this book because I just never was in the right place to take in the kind of writing I was expecting.Dreams of Speaking was published one year before Sorry, and the writing is quite different and not as good, but the book is actually quite interesting. Jones is looking hard at modern life and the isolation caused by technology. Alice, the Austral [...]


    • Shortlisted for the Miles Franklin but I didn't like it. Too much syrupy symbolism, IMO and indigestible prose. But lots of other people loved it, so don't take any notice of me.


    • I like the prominence of technology and the shared understanding of its role that linked Alice and Mr SakamotoThe writing is excellent.


    • Die Australierin Alice ist in einer abgelegenen westaustralischen Stadt aufgewachsen. Befremden bei den Erwachsenen löste in ihrer Kindheit ihr spontan ausgesprochener Wunsch aus, dass sie später entweder Astronautin oder Surferin werden wolle. Eine selbstbewusste kräftige Sportlerin überstieg in Alices Heimatort die Vorstellungskraft. Alice war das Ausnahmekind, die begabte Torschützin, ihre Schwester Norah dagegen war bei anderen Kindern die Beliebtere. Das Verhältnis zwischen Alice und [...]


    • This is a book that, for me, started slowly and gained momentum as I read. To be honest, I only picked it because it had a "J" in the title. I'm combining the Australian Women Writers challenge with the Aussie Readers "Challenge with a Twist": each month you have to read a book whose title or author starts with the same letter as that month. "Jones" = "January". I'd initially chosen Margo Lanagan's Black Juice for January, only to find it's a collection of short stories. (Lanagan's first prize-w [...]


    • Read for my bookclub.I was really unsure about this one. It was a struggle. I read it in two parts. Was I bored with it or did I find it fascinating? Did I find the author pompous with her use of big words, or did I find her smooth and flowy?When first completed, I felt that there wasn't really much to it. While it was mildly interesting and engaging, it seemed to lack any plot or real story. Until I discussed it with my bookclub.This book was very well written. Very real. The author manages to [...]


    • At first, I was very taken with with the author's intelligence and prose style. But quickly I felt there was something wrong, at least for me. The first thing that concerned me was the use of a third-person-limited narrator that, although focused on the protagonist, is omniscient and, via the occasional adjective, opinionated. This bothered me when, for example, a dream is narrated.I also did not like the narrator’s short disquisitions on aspects of modernity (the subject of the book the prota [...]


    • I started this book with an open mind, drawn to the Japanese connection more than anything. The cover sings the authors praises from papers like The Independent. I was quite disappointed though. I found the central character, Alice, selfish and superior and did not really warm to her at all. Her relationship with Mr Sakamoto was interesting, and I would have liked the author to have expanded on this. The second part of the book was much better - the character was forced to interact and react to [...]


    • It's a synonym avalanche! Attempt at risk of synonym-induced madness. Gail Jones provides zero variance in narrative voice - it's the same painful redundancy and unforgivably tortured metaphors in narration and dialogue of the main character Alice, her boyfriend, her sister, her mother, her boyfriend's mother and her friend Mr Sakamoto. You're right, Gail Jones - your own florid elitest narrative voice is so impressive we don't need anything more. Who needs basic characterisation anyway?


    • I like her writing but, this book was too long-winded, although I did read it all I sighed everytime a new character was mentioned, because I knew "Oh no ,here comes the unnecessary (to move the story forward), backstoryNOTHING as good as her later books, especially A Guide to Berlin


    • I liked this - although it had a very peculiar tone to it. I liked the relationship between the central characters, and how they allowed each other to show themselves. Not a lot happened, but it felt like I'd learned a fair bit and shared something. I think Jones is doing something quite different that I really like - I think I'll seek out more of her novels.


    • Lyrical, poetic and typically Gail Jones, this book is rich with imagery and many layers of meaning. Alice is not Jones' finest character, but her story is beautifully crafted and explores notions of self and modernity in captivating prose.


    • "By the light of the television - a spooky indigo glow - one can see mortality itself dance on the faces of entire families. They look arrested,dumb. Death is already claiming them. Flicker is the mode of televisual morbidity." Dreams of Speaking Gail Jones






    • "She kissed him at that moment. She needed his questions to prise her, to release her tight secrets. This is the gift of the lover: to permit disclosures."


    • A thoughtful book about the many ways we communicate, or fail to communicate, with the people who mean the most to us.


    • I'm finding this book really hard to latch onto I keep finding myself putting it down to pick up something else




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